Trail cams, what's your experience, best to worst?

I’ve been using trail cams for about 15 years. I’ve probably used at least 10 different brands. I’ve only used two cellular and have had multi issues with both of them. I’d like to hear about your experience with different cams. My two cellular brands have been Moultrie 6000 , Spypoint micro link, and Spypoint cell link. The last one is supposed to convert any cam to a cell cam within a limited capacity .

4 Likes

Ive allways had the best luck out of the cheaper game cams. The pics aint as good as the newer pricer stuff. But ive got more seasons out of the simpler cheaper options then any of the fancier options ive tryed. Then if they do get water or snow or anything in them to ruin them i fill better about tossing 70 80 bucks compared to thorwing away 200 or more bucks. I deffently see an advantage though to the new linked style cams so you dont have tromp through the woods everytime you want check pics. There is so many options now days its tough call.

4 Likes

I recently bought a trail cam, set it up in back yard to be sure it worked, night vision as well. Also to get a sense of the best way to set it up.

No. 1 thing I will do different, not set it up where coniferous branches are in front of it. I got 800+ photos of the branch every time it moved. I need to check if there is a movement sensor adjustment for that.

Otherwise nothing more to report.

6 Likes

'Not set it up in front of the coniferous branches"

I learned a long time ago not to set em up in the spring! Up north here branches get leaves and drop. You get about a million useless pics before one good one. The best non- cellular cam for me is Bushnell hands down . Oddly, the next best is also one of cheaper ones from Amazon for $49.99. ( I actually caught a sale of two for $89) call Wosport. They’re 30 megapixel and 1920 video and come with a 32 meg sd card. The only down side to these is one went bad within a month. I gave them a crappy review. They contacted me, apologized and sent me a new cam. No issues since ( about a year). The video is excellent with sound, you can hear deer grunting, turkeys putting, etc .

4 Likes

@Grumpyolman
Glad others had the same problem as I.
I’ll check later on the make/model I bought, it’s a higher end model, came with Duracell batteries and sim card with micro SD, strap… complete ready to go.

2 Likes

No idea if these are any good, but at 30 bucks a pop…

Wildview Trail Cam $29.99

4 Likes

“at $30 a pop”
lol my cheapest cam is a Primos that I paid less than $10 for at a gun show some years back. It has literally no features. You have to program the date and time on the SD card in your computer every time you change the batteries, then there’s an on/off switch. It still works though.
I just checked Amazon and they have some Wosport cameras for $29. No idea if they’re any good.

3 Likes

@Grumpyolman ive had and ran just about every camera on the market and the best for functionality and reliability overall I’ve found are wildgame this year I’ve bought 2 wildgame cell to try and so far I’m liking them I also have a tacicam cell I bought last year to try and I like it also haven’t had any issues with either one as for SPYPOINT they are garbage in my opinion

3 Likes

I’ve had 3 Wildgame Innovation cameras. Every one would decide to shut itself off after taking a couple pictures . I never could figure out why. I’ve had; Muddy,Primos,Stealthcam,Tactacam,Leupold,Moultrie,Spypoint,Bushnell,Browning, and Wosports. My old Bushnell is still working and takes great pictures . The Wosports take the best quality video and sound out of all and are very affordable .

2 Likes

I’ll have to try the cell version , I’m gun shy when it comes to Wildgame Innovation stuff though

2 Likes

I’m gun shy and won’t even think about using spypoint or stealth cam

2 Likes

Yeah well , like I said I’ve had issues with Spypoint. Moultrie cameras seem more reliable but I don’t like their plan charges.

3 Likes

Here are some photos of the Muddy Trail Cam bundle I purchased.
Seems to be just fine for what I need it for. Also good for home.

3 Likes

Muddy are good, I had two. I left em out all year and moisture got in and corroded the batteries and terminals. I’ve had that happen with a couple brands. Winter is brutal up here.
The absolute worst were my Leupolds. I bought a three pack with a proprietary programer/ reader. They all went to a 1/2 color 1/2 Bleah pinkish photo finish in less than a year. Leupold refunded my money.

2 Likes

@Grumpyolman
Agreed, I’d say the Muddy was in the medium price range, but I was also a bundled package, which was very convenient.

4 Likes

I have one Moultrie Edge which requires an SD card and two Moultrie Delta Base units which don’t require a card. They aren’t cheap but they all take great pics and I’m extremely satisfied with them. I wish I had known about the Delta Base units before I bought the Edge as it requires a subscription to either AT&T or Verizon. The Delta’s auto select whatever cell signal is strongest out of 4 carriers. I don’t know how other products operate but I like that I can suspend service (and charges) whenever I choose.

The advice about placement to avoid movement from tree branches, leaves falling etc is sage advice.

4 Likes

I’ve never heard of the Delta base. I’ll have to look into them. You don’t need a Verizon or AT&T account for the other cameras. Those are simply the towers that the cameras work off of. I have Moultrie VX- 6000 cameras that work off Verizon towers because there’s one on the mountain where I hunt. My phone service is through T-Mobile. My Spypoint cameras are two working off At&t towers and two that work off Verizon ( when they work, I don’t recommend Spypoint).

2 Likes

My son this year bought 2 black gate cell cameras after talking with a couple of his buddies and he loves them and says the customer service is good R4G - Black Gate Hunting Products

2 Likes

The only real issue I have with the Moultrie cams, and this may be common to all trail cams, is the limited field of vision, it just doesn’t seem to me to be that wide. Also, of less significance, and again this may be common to all battery powered trail cams, when I have it set to report immediately it drains the batteries down pretty quickly. I have all mine set to report every 3 hours if any pictures are taken. With them on that setting I haven’t had to change out my batteries since I changed to that setting, going on almost 2 months now. They take a lot of batteries too, 12 in the one and 16 in the other two.

2 Likes

@meplattjr
Definitely, I was also surprised how many batteries, at least the newer units use.
I haven’t benchmarked how long the Muddy last.