M*CARBO Brotherhood

Snubby Revolvers: Obsolete?

Be sure to let me know your thoughts folks!

Howard

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I sold a few years back my Colt Cobra 38 special with 2" barrel. I miss it still.

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Great topic HR!
I believe it comes down to what a person is comfortable with.
May the Sith be with you.

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I don’t think snubbies will ever be obsolete. I purchased S&W/CT laser for my wife because I know she’ll never swap mags or take the slide off a pistol to clean & lubricate it. The best I can hope for is her using a bore snake & some CLP ! If it’s to big or to heavy she won’t carry it, better to have 5 in the purse than 17 at home ! Bullets for self protection have made vast improvements in the last 8 to 10 years, you don’t have to rely on something not effective for your needs.

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As long as something is still capable of stopping an attack, it will never be obsolete.

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That’s why even edged and impact weapons will never be “obsolete”

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Accurate, reliable, an effective caliber and capable of delivering multiple rounds on target. Worked for me for 15 yrs. I carried a S&W Chief’s Spec Mod 36 in 38 spec, and later a S&W mod 19 2 1/2 in 357mag. These were my duty guns as a Detective. I carried a speed strip in each suite coat pocket, and in colder weather added two speed loaders to my outer jacket pockets. Those guns were later replaced with a S&W mod 6906 in 9mm and finally a Glock mod 27 in 40 cal. Still have them. The Mod 36 is about the same size as many of the current micro-compacts with maybe a round or two less. I will be obsolete well before my snubbies will.

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My Taurus 942 22wmr Ultra lite 2 inch 8 rnd , is my favorite.
With 40 grain jhps it’s a plenty.
Great little edc secondary…
Carried a 2 inch 357 7 rnds Taurus 617 for years. Great .
Now older carry a PMR 30 with Mcarbo upgrade ,filled with CCI 40 grn jhps.
30 rounds in a pistol low recoil.
Perfect for me.

my 942.
My taurus 617.
Now I carry the fully enhanced PMR30 .
Recoil and firepower .
Sometimes with the 942 as backup.
Others if I’m dressing up. I carry a Bond Derringer double 45 acp. Good rib gun.
My favorite carry now.

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Personally, my revolvers are range toys and are only carried in low threat situations where I’m intentionally choosing to cary the revolver because aestetics or something equally silly. Something like a Sig P365 or similar sub compact auto packs more than 2x the bullets in a flatter, but otherwise similar footprint and reloads faster (even vs speedloaders) is clearly a better choice most of the time. The only time I would recommend a J frame these days is for someone w/o the grip strength to operate a semi auto.

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Love this topic im a huge revolver fan and a taurus 357 2 inch barrel is what i have carried for years. I do carry my semi autos at times but snub revolver is my go to. Having the extra rounds is nice with semi autos but even a well maintained semi can jam,stovepipe or who knows depending on weather and ammo and all kinds of different situations. I trust that my revolver is gonna go bang everytime. And id rather have 1 good 357 round or 45lc then a mag full of 9mm. I love all my 9mm guns and even have taking deer with my sub2k and hi point carbine. But for edc i trust my revolvers and my big bullets. Id say it comes down to preference and what each person is most comfortable with. I dont think the snubby will ever be obsolete.

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SIG P365, especially w/ 12rd mag: “Hold my beer…”

:rofl:

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All depends on what I’m wearing. A Ruger LCP in 327 magnum gives me 6 shots in a package the same size as a model 36. Jacket weather, the shoulder rigs come out with either my modified 6906 or an IMI Jericho. Hell, I’ll carry a ported NAA 22 magnum with a handkerchief sandwiching it in gym shorts. Whatever you got on you always trumps whatever is in the safe!

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I have a S &W 637-2 with a ported Bbl, factory tuned. 38 Spl. Smooth as silk. My carry side arm.

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Welcome to the forum, @Ignatz. As @James said, “whatever you got on you trumps whatever is in the safe!” I’m not much of a revolver fan myself because they’re harder for me to shoot with my arthritis, but I’ve been known to carry a J-frame from time to time. :smile:

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My S&W model 10, with a couple of speed strips, is still my EDC. Love my snubbie. (and if you decide your model 19 becomes, “obsolete,” please let me know and I will assist you in getting rid of it! :grinning: :wink:)

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Highly unlikely that they’ll ever become obsolete. I never understood why my 2.5" S&W .357 had a target trigger and adjustable sights though.

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stop, send them to me. i love wheel guns!

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I personally carry the new Springfield Hellcat, but before that I carried an LC9s (which is almost exactly the same dimensions as the Hellcat, but the grip is an 1/8th inch thinner). While I was carrying the LC9s (which is a 7 round single stack magazine plus one in the pipe), I had briefly considered buying a Taurus m605b (2 inch 5-shot .357). When it comes to revolvers, caliber can be a deciding factor for some folks. Personally, I think 9mm is a perfectly fine cartridge for self-defense, but .357 mag hits a lot harder, even out of a 2 inch barrel. I think as long as you’re proficient with what you’re carrying, and it’s not a .25 auto or .32 acp, you’re going to be covered with 5 rounds, although I would recommend carrying a speed strip with it. According to the FBI crime statistics the average number of shots fired by civilians in defensive shootings is 2. Remember - that’s an average, across lots of defensive shootings. I think a lot of people develop a “worst-case scenario” in their head that includes multiple attackers, or having to shoot a guy through cover at 15 yards, etc. I admit, I do this myself sometimes. I think that scenario is what makes people look at a 5 or 6 shot revolver, and pass on it. I know it’s an unlikely scenario, and that if I ever have to pull my carry pistol, I won’t need anywhere near the 14 rounds I’m carrying, but for some folks, they can’t get past it, and they’ll take whatever they feel gives them the rounds they need for that scenario in their head. So, I definitely think that snubbie revolvers still have a place for EDC/Concealed carry for the right person.

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@darkaynjil (et al)

I don’t think it is as simple as just capacity. How effective are the rounds you would load in the gun? How fast can you shoot the gun? How fast can you reload the gun? Where do you live - rural area, small town, or big city? How good a shot are you under stress? What kind of neighborhood do you live in - safe or crime ridden? Will you have other guns ready to help you fend off any/all attackers? Will you carry any of these extra guns with you when you face your attackers? How fast can you draw these additional guns when needed (think, New York reload). And the list goes on and on…

However, addressing the capacity issue directly:

Maybe a good rule of thumb is to have at least 3 bullets available per likely attacker. So, for two attackers, you would need a minimum of 6 bullets immediately available.

Why 3 per likely attacker? 1 to 2 in case you miss and/or hit in a non-vital zone, 1 to 2 to hit in a vital zone. So, average 3 shots per attacker. You may not end up shooting 3 shots, per attacker, but it seems beneficial to be prepared to do so, just in case.

Also, would you be okay with completely emptying your gun in the process of defending yourself? What if you do and then another attacker shows up? Or, maybe the attacker you shot wasn’t really stopped and is now attacking you again?

Personally, I would hate to run out of bullets when being attacked, regardless of how many attackers. Would feel much better to have at least a couple of shots left after the attacker(s) has/have been stopped, just in case…

So, either one gun with a high capacity (at least 10 shots), or two (or more) guns with a similar capacity overall, is what seems sensible to me. Look at police officers - how many rounds total do they carry on their person and do they often/generally rely on also having a backup gun on them?

Regarding some of the other factors: those can affect things like how many attackers are most likely; how much power per shot you can safely have (if you, for example are in a condo, bullets going thru walls becomes a bigger issue, and control over your shots does, too); how big (and roomy) is your home? If the room sizes are large and the hallways are long, accuracy becomes a bigger issue.

How consistently can/do you shoot your personal defense weapon(s)? I use the rule that if I can always keep my groups on a hand-sized target at 7 yards, those weapons should work fine for most of my likely defense situations. You might have different rules for accuracy and consistency.

Perhaps listening to some of the gun experts’ advice would help you (I am not a gun expert). People like Massad Ayoob, Paul Harrell, Jerry Miculek, and others, in my opinion, would be some good choices.

And finally, gun choice - I agree that snubby revolvers have a place in personal defense settings. Not sure I would want to just rely on a single snubby, though.

Good luck either way.

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As I mentioned earlier, in my 1st post, caliber choice can be a factor. There are going to be times when a .357 magnum or .45 colt might make a difference. As I also mentioned above, the average number of shots fired by a civilian (not a cop or off-duty leo, etc.) in a defensive shooting is 2. That IS an average across thousands of defensive shootings - you need to bear that in mind (although, if memory serves, a majority of them were between 2-4 shots fired, with some outliers, such as an elderly woman who shot once, a guy who emptied a Glock, and only scored 1 hit, etc. It also depends on your ability and confidence with a particular handgun. I personally wouldn’t have a problem carrying a revolver - I’m an excellent shot with them in either double or single action, but it’s the reload under stress that I’m not so great at. Someone with tons of experience and practice loading their revolver would probably have no qualms whatsoever. In any case, I’m certainly not going to tell anyone NOT to carry a revolver, rather that if they’re going to carry one, take advantage of the revolver calibers, carry speedloaders/strips, and practice a LOT, to include reloads.

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