M*CARBO Brotherhood

Snakes USA thread 🐍

First snake of the season. Hard to identify when they’re small.:eyes:

Copperhead? Rattlesnake? Anyone have an idea?

Western North Carolina here.

That’s my sweetheart holding it for me …she’s brave!!! :eyes::sunglasses::eye:

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@MountainHunter Can’t really tell, if that joker’s poisonous you’d better watch him when they’re small they will empty their venom sack in you. They haven’t learned to ration their venom yet. If I was taking a guess I’d say a rattler.

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@MountainHunter not a Copperhead. They have hourglass shaped skin pattern and different shaped head.

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Common King snake, they eat other snakes. Good snakes to have around your home !

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@DirtSalior Ya they are they are immune to a pit viper bite as well, but are you sure that’s a kingsanake?

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Thanks ALL…she relocated it across the road and off the property into the woods by the creek…:grin:

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YEP, Harpers & Row’s Complete Field Guide to N. American Wildlife ( Eastern Edition) told me !

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Description: The eastern kingsnake is fairly stout with a black back marked with a chain- like pattern of thin white or yellow bars. The belly has yellow or white patches on a black background. … In the western-most mountains of North Carolina , the kingsnake’s chain- like markings are usually broken up into tiny spots.

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Rattlesnake skull

Rattlesnake fangs are connected by venom ducts to large venom glands near the outer edge of the upper jaw, towards the rear of the head. When the rattlesnake bites, muscles on the sides of the venom glands contract, which squeezes the venom through the ducts and into the fangs. When the fangs are not in use, they remain folded against the palate.

Rattlesnakes are born with fully functioning fangs and venom, and are capable of killing prey at birth.
Adult rattlesnakes shed their fangs every 6–10 weeks. At least three pairs of replacement fangs lie behind the functional pair.

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Your welcome ! :innocent: :innocent: :innocent: :innocent: :innocent: :innocent: :innocent: :innocent: No big deal !

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I don’t think that’s a king snake. Download the pic so you can zoom in on it. Look at the head. It has a triangle viper head.

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:eye: admit to NOT BEING an expert on the snakes…:see_no_evil:

:eye:’ve walked across alligator heads in creeks in Florida without thinking twice…

so please help me out!!!:eyes::scream::eye::sunglasses:

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eastern massasauga rattlesnake maybe.

I downloaded your pics so I could zoom in on the head and it has a distinct triangle viper look to me.

I’m not 100% though. If it is, they are rare and nearly extinct.

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@jeffing65 definitely a viper by the head but I didn’t wanna cause a stir. I’m no snake expert but I do read and watch a lot about them.

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Need to start looking around they are coming out of there holes and one little one usually means there’s more

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@Whitehammer Reptile mating season, they are out and feeling freaky, my kayak doesn’t go in the backcreeks til end of May. The big lizards are really unpredictable this time of year

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@Kona I’m confident it’s a viper. I can’t find my eastern US reptile field guide at the moment, but from the markings, the only one I think it can be is the Eastern Massasauga rattlesnake. I won’t bet my life on it but I’m sure enough that I would bet a paycheck.
I’m not an expert either, but in this case, it is something you don’t want to make a mistake about.
Juvenile reptiles are hard to tell with some species because they are marked or colored differently when they are first born. (I don’t know if that is the case with this one or not however)

@MountainHunter
If it is that species, I am VERY envious. Getting the chance to see a rare animal (and especially capture one) is something not many people, including biologists in that field, ever get the chance to do.

PS: Thanks to you and your wife for relocating it instead of killing it. :clap: :clap: :ok_hand: :ok_hand:

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@jeffing65 that’s exactly right adolescent snakes of certain species can look like a completely different snake cottonmouths are a good example of a species that can look different. I will disagree with you on the relocation though. If I see a venomous snake it’s over. I feel the responsibility to save a future life from being taken possibly a child

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At first I thought it was a pilot snake.

Does it have white scales and smooth belly?

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I knew a guy, Larry the Snake Man that traveled with about 14 non venomous snakes to carnivals and fairs all over the south east during the summer months. He hung out with the Tiger King and the Cat Lady. Diamond Jim, Banjo Billy, those were the days!

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