M*CARBO Brotherhood

Self Reliance In A Modern Age


#82

@Johnksg lol well not me personally. Lucky for us my buddy’s girlfriend did though. They were stretchy enough to be able to put enough tension on the pulley to spin the water pump and fan.


#83

@jeffing65 well a big :+1: for her being willing to sacrifice her under britches so you could get home!

They just don’t make women like they used to.


#84

@Johnksg hahaha…and that is so true.
And for some years after that were occasionally reminded that no matter how awesome our brush rigs were, or how cool we all thought we were,… we were still saved by a girl. lol


#85

@DivaMarie Feel free to vent anytime brother! Your values are to be respected and I suspect shared by many of us “old codgers” on the forum!


#86

@jeffing65 I am saved by my wife whenever I need toilet paper! That is simply the one thing she ALWAYS has on hand and never forgets to pack.


#87

I try to be as self reliant as I can be. I have restored an old cast iron meat slicer and slice my own meat and cheese when I can find it. Learned to make sausage, taught myself how to reload, have rebuilt more than a few motorcycles. Not to mention a small arsenal at home. I kind of think of it as a mentality of being ready for anything through daily habits.


#88

@Squidder_K And I suspect better living! Food you caught, grew, or processed tastes better…plus you have the satisfaction of doing it yourself!


#89

I have the tools to do the job. I have basic training that I try to keep up on/use daily so I don’t forget. Basic first aid/cpr, ham radio operation, been an auto tech for a bit over 15 years. I laugh at the people who stare at their flat tire like it’s going to change itself. Have some basic outdoors skills that I am always learning more. I’m a info sponge, like to learn new things. Jack of all trades master of none. Starting up a square foot garden if I can ever get time off work.

Goals in the future:
Pistol training
Rifle training
Long distance training.
Basic hunting (no one in my family hunts)


#90

Your 100% correct if it’s not done properly can be lethal to people further down the line. It is the reason that grid connect solar systems go down when there is a power out to protect people working on the grid.

If not done correctly when power comes back on you will blow your generator the main line into your meter box must be isolated before running power backwards through your house.

Another danger is that you are powering power points without safety switches/ circuit breakers a very dangerous thing to do as they are devices to save people’s lives if there is power leakage through a device unless your genset is protected I would not advise this.

My house is set up to run properly via genset with a isolation switch before power in to house a power point between the isolator and my fuse box so my house is still protected we use 240 volt in Australia, gensets are fantastic but MUST BE WIRED IN PROPERLY


#91

@jeffing65 Now that was definitely a pretty darned ingenious fix on the brakes. Another great (and simple) way to fix a problem like that is a pair of vice grips. This came back to mind a while back after I bought my “new” 55 year old Jeep and was assessing what I needed to carry for backcountry emergency repairs and I noticed it has one brake line off of the master cylinder to all four corners, lose one wheel cylinder and no more brakes. Vice grips. :+1:


#92

Ain’t that the truth!!!


#93

@jeffing65 I try to give my kids the same courtesy as you all had as kids as did I. However they can roam the farm as much ad they like but I do not allow them to roam in town unsupervised its just not as safe as it was when I was young. There is a meth amphetamine problem in the nearest town high crime rate etc


#94

@Craig75 That’s completely understandable. When I was a kid it was safe to be in town or with the general public, but those times are gone. Now there are all kinds of things to be concerned about that didn’t exist in the past.


#95

@TriggerHappy I wished for vise grips a dozen times that day. I didn’t have any in the trucks tool box for some reason. They are a must for sure and would have been the simple and easy fix to the problem that day.


#96

ok guys ive been a bold boy i wont do it again im grounded for a week :hot_face::innocent::zap::zap::zap:


#97

@johnksg I guess eating that good stuff is what you do when there is no pie available (which is the emergency)?


#98

@CatFood

I find that quality a benefit. Having some knowledge and skill, covering a wide scope of subjects, gives you a better chance of being effective in the most situations.
In addition to that, your desire and willingness to learn and try new things shows confidence instead of being too intimidated to act when presented with a problem, which some people are.

And the flat those people are staring at is only flat on the bottom. lol


#99

@Craig75 I feel the same way! I want for my son to have the freedom I had as a youth but the truth is the world has changed. The days when a kid can ride his bike to the store, with his .22 rifle on the handle bar’s, to buy comic books and bubble gum are long gone!

Another problem is the drugs…I have to screen parents and orchestrate “play dates” because so many of the parents are drug users. (I work with the foster children 3 days a week as a volunteer - trust me there are a LOT of them!)


#100

True! The flat thing is so funny!


#101

@jeffing65 I agree, a good “generalist” is always more valuable than a “specialist” in a wide variety of situations. Sadly it seems that is a philosophy our society is losing in the tech-driven age!