M*CARBO Brotherhood

Photography Anyone? 📸

Latest outing…
Aww yes the life of the male Monarch Butterfly.

Male monarch butterflies are distinguished from the females by a black spot that the males have on each hindwing. Butterflies will begin mating within 3-8 days after emerging from the chrysalis. If born in early- or mid-summer, the butterfly will live for between two and six weeks, focusing on reproduction while feeding from the nectar of blossoming flowers. Adults that emerge late in summer will live considerably longer – between 6 and 9 months – as they must migrate to wintering grounds in Mexico and California.
Monarch butterfly’s are peaking, nice to see so may around. This one on a Milk Weed plant.
The population was looking a bit grim several years ago.

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Plant more Milk Weed they thrive on it !

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No need where I was were thousands of milk weed plants and hundreds of butterflies.
Was crazy to see so many of them.

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Single horsefly power on my buddies truck

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It kinda resembles Bezos new Space “Toy”…

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Put a saddle on that bad boy

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Aren’t they supposed to have “N” numbers wings and fuselage???

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Reminds me of taking Scouts to Camp Sylvan in Canada where the mosquitos were both huge and hungry. We used to joke about putting rocks in the pants of the smaller Scouts so they didn’t get carried away.

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Minnesota’s state bird from my understanding.

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Interesting, guess there are a lot of different kinds.
Here is a picture of the ones locally… and I have seen them longer than an inch in length, we call them ones moose flies and they more commonly feed on the hind end of moose, to the point of leaving large open wounds that ooze blood and tissue fluids. Probably a relief to the moose to head for the water for some relief.

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@Moosecall
It’s a Black Horse Fly. I use iNaturalist as an identifier app. These guys are most common along the meadows of DuPage river where it really slows. Water levels being what they are now has caused a lot of stagnation and fish kill/clam kills so these guys are freaking everywhere!

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I’d never swat a moose on the butt to kill one of those ! :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

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One time, up north, I watched a moose cross the road and when it jumped the ditch on the other side I gasped at the sheer number of moose flies on it’s back end.
When it jumped they took to the air in a cloud and you could see a large white patch of hairless skin with oozing stuff then in seconds they all landed back and the moose sent into the bush.
Was crazy to see that.

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Probably soon to be a ghost animal there. Between that and the ticks……ouch

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I wasn’t aware of the plague of ticks feeding on moose, never seen that here.
But the tick population has exploded here and the range is expanding big time.
I personally despise them very much and have been fed on by one the whole of a night I didn’t know was on me. It left a hole that has never really healed well, always wondered if part of it is still in there as I noticed the spot it fed when I took my boot off. It did produce a 2" red ring around the bite but I never gave it second thought to go get checked, that was about 5 years ago now.
I’m hoping I didn’t get Lyme disease, but when I eventually did ask doc he told me I would have developed signs by now, for sure, so guessing it was a wood tick or other.

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Don’t want to drift to far off topic , but closure on the tick issue. A variant of the Lyme disease if out there now, read all about it, right here.

Rare photo opportunity last night. Got a shot of this rainbow, it came and went in 5 minutes, I could have easily missed it. Time to sell… :grimacing:

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Chuff in box

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Missing cat for 36 hrs. is back. :grin::cat:

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Like I said before…you fed it. At least ki-ki knows she’s got a roof somewhere.

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Typical… women… :roll_eyes:

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