M*CARBO Brotherhood

New Hunting Rifle

I’m thinking of buying a new hunting rifle. Maybe a 30-06. Something with a little more reach out and touch. Any recommendations?

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What are your intentions to hunt? And situation may help other people give you in put.
But from me I love 7mm Rem Mag. Price per round of similar ammo is slightly higher to comparable 30.06 so hunting not a huge deal but not a paper puncher. It packs a punch and can fly flatter in similar distance.

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Will be for deer mostly. Would love to get a bear stamp one of these seasons. It’s a lottery system here. More open terrain where a longer shot 200 yds may be necessary.

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I have just put together a model 70 in 6.5 creedmoor and am very happy with it’s accuracy have put the ever trusty 308 in the cupboard. More than enough range out to 1200metre still supersonic. Have been told accurate to 1400metre but my range only goes to 1200m

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@FrankG
This is how I would look at it and some I shoot. My preference is a bolt action, although I do own a Browning BLR lever action .308
If you can/want to only buy one rifle, you should chose a rifle that can perform across the widest spectrum possible or that you would ever shoot. I have a number of remington 700 ADL and BDL rifles in different calibers, I have a ruger M77 and like winchester mod 70 as well.
For me the next choice would have be Magnum or not.
For caliber I would look at ballistics to find the ones best suited to what you want, and then out of those compare range of available bullet sizes, cost, availability, etc. For the bigger non-mags. I like .270,25/06, 30/06, .308 with 30/06 being my favorite.
I have always followed the philosophy of never settle for the least or something that is lacking in some ways to a slightly more powerful, better design/quality, more accessory availability. etc.
Just a little more in cost (1-2 hundred) for the next step up in grade, can make the difference between an average, ok, “but mediocre” gun and a nice quality shooter, that is a must for big game hunting. Especially out in open country. A shot at a giant desert mulie out here in the Idaho high desert might only be there for a moment and 350-400 yrds. No time for unreliable and mediocre.
@Doitsouthstyle
@Craig75 These guys and some of the other members can give you great advise on the mags and those like the creedmoor.

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I’m looking into the Bergara HMR. It’s a cross between hunting and long range shooting and I’ve been reading its a fantastic rifle for what it is. It’s a very solid rifle that is accurate out of the box. Even at 1000 yards, guys were fairly in love with it

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Like your choice in rifles, some of the best there. Hunted for 30 yrs with a Marlin lever action, but always thought about a Browning BLR. Always wanted a good semiauto too, so when I did make the move I went with a Browning Safari in 300 WSM. Top quality rifle in a caliber that would allow me to hunt just about anything, anywhere. Used it here in Wis. several yrs ago to take my first bear. I too have never been of the mindset that a particular gun was “good enough”. Rather than spend X number of 's on a gun, I have never regretted waiting a bit and spending X+ 's for one that I can be proud to own and to pass on to the next generation.

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I am gonna put in a vote for the Savage Axis II. My wife bought 5 of them last year in .243 and .308 for the kids as deer rifles.

So far they have done the job in the Pacific Northwest and between general and nuisance tags we have filled ALL of the freezers!

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@Johnksg Savage makes great rifles that are very affordable and have one of the best out of the box triggers, I have the Savage 10P-SR in .308 with 5R rifling, more of a police sniper rifle (P-SR) than a hunting rifle…I don’t hunt.

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my favorite is RUGER #1. i bought my 45/70 new, the 300 winmag and 458 mag used bout 1/2 price. im a sucker for a single shot falling block…

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@dave67 I don’t hunt anymore either, but I do love Savage rifles. I have the 10FP and the 10FCP-HS both in .308 and they have served me well in long range shoots.

I am kind cheap, love a good “blue collar” weapon that works well right out of the box!

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the safari is a nice choice. the value of a quality gun is shown every time you shoot it.

my dad was the same way. I have guns given to me that were bought and then handed down with the same ideal.
A quality gun will almost always retain or gain in value. Better investment than bank interest.

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@jeffing65

You know I very seldom disagree with anyone here, and I used to believe the same thing.

Problem is dealers are having a harder and harder time selling the guns of yesteryear. The new generation of gun buyers for the most part are not interested in them. Prices for old guns are dropping to match lack of demand.

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I hadn’t really thought about that but your right. The new generation is a completely different market.
I still stand by the quality of a gun being worth the investment, both in its performance and just as you said, something worthy of passing on.

As for the drop in old gun prices overall, maybe that can turn into a good thing for us. It might make some of them affordable, where they weren’t before, or allow us to splurge on an extra one now and again.

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Savage 99E .308 was my Eastern Wash Mule Deer choice.

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@jeffing65 and @DivaMarie don’t get me wrong, I value and cherish the old guns…pre '64 Winchester model 70s, S&W model 27s guns had beauty and character back then!

However these days its all about the “black guns” and to be honest they are better in so many ways. Sub MOA groups out of the box were unheard of in the old days.

I did an evaluation for some old prewar Lugers and a C96 Mauser last year, the dealer still has not sold them, no one wants to meet his price.

Times are a changing and what used to be true is no longer so.

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I would surely have to agree that times change, and what was doesn’t always survive that change, to what is.
As for new, compared to old, there is no question. The advances in materials, design, machining etc of modern weapons trumps even the best from a previous era.
I ( my individual and personal perspective and not what the times reflect as in our discussion) don’t see this as an inadequacy in function or being substandard when put to the test against the new generation. They just don’t have the advantage of possessing the advances that came after them.

When it comes to anything such as this, perception is reality. If the perception of somethings value, desirability, quality of function and design, applicable and functioning place in the present, or any other attribute is no longer considered to be that, then as you said it will remain on a dealers shelf.

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There does appear to be a lack of appreciation of the “classics” by the newer generations. Just like their cell phones, it’s all about the latest and greatest. You can see this by how often they trade their current gun or phone in to get the newest model with the most up to date features. I do appreciate the new, but only because I have experienced the old and can appreciate how we got to where we are today. I have handguns from a pair of single shot Kentucky percussion pistols to S&W revolvers and Glock and Sig semiautos. Rifles from Thompson Center black powder to lever action and Browning semi auto, AR-15 and AK47. It’s not about how many rounds it can hold or how fast you can shoot. In the end it’s all about pulling a trigger and hitting the target.

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@Dane and @jeffing65 I am like both of you. When you hold a firearm of either significant beauty or history you admire it far beyond its function.

In some ways modern weapons are ALL function and nothing else.

I hope there is always those whom appreciate older weapons…but I do not see that in the younger generation with few exceptions.

I do not see that many youngsters willing to pay for $19,000 for an early (pre-issue) Walther P38 these days.

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In the collection my brothers and I inherited from my father were several military rifles including an M1 Garand, British 303, Italian Carcano and Japanese Arisaka. None were of any great monetary value. The value was in the appreciation of the men who wielded these weapons to defend freedom and of the weapons they faced in their sacrifices. Same with some of the pistols, gov. issue 1911 45cal and 1917 Colt 45 cal revolver, german Luger and Bergman Bayard in 9mm Largo. It was somewhat of an eclectic collection totaling 55 rifles, shotguns, pistols and revolvers. All of which have their place in history, and their own lessons to teach.

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