M*CARBO Brotherhood

Muzzle Brake Range Report

@Aravena There are many other muzzle brakes and compensators out there and I have tried them on my Glock 35 (.40S&W) before I ever got my Sub-2000 G17/22 (.40S&W). These muzzle brakes and compensators fit both my G35 & S2K G17/22 barrels and I can say that the MCARBO looks the best, is one of the better performers and has the best finish on it in my opinion. You can not go wrong with the MCARBO Muzzle Brake.

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@dave67 I think you win the twist on barrel end accessory toy category lol :sunglasses: :+1:

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@dave67 I have been considering the Kaw Valley Precision linear compensator. How well does it work for you?

@Gatekeeper I have the KVP comp on my 9mm. It directs the blast and noise forward and away from you and does not control the recoil of the weapon. Good for use in an enclosed darkened area.

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@Gatekeeper I would agree with Don68 comment on the KVP comp as well as other linear compensators. A muzzle brake with porting on top will help reduce muzzle rise and porting on the sides if angled back can help reduce some felt recoil.

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Actually I was considering for my KT CMR30. It is .22 magnum no recoil to worry about but loud as can be. Supressors are illegal in Illinois. Legislators here think they are an “Assassins tool”. They believe a scilencer is like the movies, “Pfssst! Pfssst!” 2 rounds down range.:joy: Nevermind trying to protect your hearing if you have tinnitus. Oh yeah that little thing called the sound barrier (1125ft/s) and the sonic boom that goes with it.

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@Gatekeeper Ok, then a linear compensator sounds like what you need. Probably not a cure all but it will help “push” the blast and loud report away from you down range.

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How is everyone removing the thread protector? The one on our S2K seems to be on there pretty well. I’ve cranked on it with a wrench with the rifle laying on the bench, but it wouldn’t budge. Before I head out to the shop and chuck it up in the vise, what’s the successful procedure?

Gene Beaird,
Pearland, Texas

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@FoldedCarbine Try a little heat . Should do the trick for you.

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I guess I’ll do what I did with a solid-state camera I received that I couldn’t get the access cap off of; stick it in the freezer for an hour and then stick the end under the hot water dispenser until I hear the ‘pop’ of the part expanding. :slight_smile:

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@FoldedCarbine If that does not work, try a propane torch

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If I do that, I could end up with a crusty barrel and a handful of burnt springs. =8-0

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@FoldedCarbine
First, are you turning it the right direction?
Silly question but i had to ask.

Hold the grip between your knees and twist rocking it back and forth

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Yes, I am. Unlike the barrel lock nut on our MKA-1919, the thread protector on the S2K is a right-hand thread. The nut seems pretty tight. I’ve even lightly-tapped the wrench trying to loosen it. I’ll try the freezer/hot water next. Thank you.

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@FoldedCarbine Find yourself a (Flare / Brake line Wrench) and Smack It, It will come off.

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My problem is not getting a hold of it, but getting it loose. I can use a 6-point boxed-end wrench, and a flare nut wrench will work, too.

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@FoldedCarbine I just suggested the flare wrench because it will not slip and will support itself on the nut leaving no room for Error/Human Factor.:smile:

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The solution: Impact gun!

I took the rifle out to my shop, clamped the front end into my vise with aluminum jaw adapters and had it wrapped in a towel. Got a 5/8" flare nut wrench and my mallet and whacked on the wrench a few times. All it would do is rotate the entire rifle.

I put a couple of drops of spray lube on the nut, removed the front handguard so I could get a better grip on the barrel. Locked the barrel in the vise between the aluminum jaw adapters, wrapped in a towel. Whacked the flare nut wrench with the mallet again. Again, all I accomplished was rotating the entire rifle in the vise.

Got the heat gun out and pointed it at the nut for a while, getting it nice and toasty. Same results with the mallet, just rotated the rifle.

Then I remembered the ease I enjoy using an impact gun to get alternator nuts and such off of things that are round and tend to freely-rotate when trying to remove the nut with a wrench.

With a 6-point socket and my Snap-On electric impact gun, the nut came off with a couple of bursts. Finally, success!

Still need to schedule a range day to test the new brake, but will report back what I find. I also replaced some parts on our .45 AR-15, so I need to test that work, too.

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My goodness, Papapaul, you look EXACTLY like our old Veterinarian!!

Nice work on teaching that paper a lesson, too! :slight_smile:

Gene Beaird,
Pearland, Texas

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What does it mean to “TIME” the muzzle brake? How would I be able to tell if the timing is “off”? How is correction made?
Please forgive my newbie-ness.

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