M*CARBO Brotherhood

Lock, Stock and Barrel

I am watching a series on Amazon Prime called American Guns. It is pretty interesting but a bit shallow. In one episode, they discussed the origin of the common phrase heading this category. Early on, the three primary firearm components were each made by separate craftsmen. Thus, one would build the firing mechanism or “Lock” (what we would call the receiver), another would build the wooden stock, and a third would build the barrel. The owner would need to acquire all three components and assemble them or have someone do it.

Eventually, manufacturers began providing all three components, sometimes fully assembled. From them an owner could acquire everything needed; i.e. “Lock, Stock and Barrel”.

I found this interesting and it led me to think of other ways firearm history has impacted our vocabulary. For example, someone may be said to stand “ramrod straight” or you may be advised to “keep your powder dry”.

Please share other examples. This is not just an academic exercise but will help demonstrate the pervasive role of firearms and the fundamental right to possess them throughout our country’s history.

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Don’t go off “half-cocked” Fig. to go into action too early or without thinking. (Originally refers to a flintlock or matchlock gun firing prematurely, before the trigger was pulled.) Don’t go off half - cocked .

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Fire , ready , aim . This phrase reflects taking action and figuring out the details later. Although some situations call for this type of response, it can often lead to undesirable results, both in life and in business.

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How about “I’m gunning for you”.
Meaning:
Supporting someone or something. Sally is my friend, so of course I’m gunning for her in the election.

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“Full bore” from the source of bore as hole made by boring, early 14c meaning “cylindrical hole through a tube, gun, etc.” is from 1570’s; that of “interior diameter of a tube, caliber of gun” (whether bored or not) is from 1580’s. Hence figurative slang “full bore” (1936) “at maximum speed.”

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Mexican Standoff
A Mexican standoff is a confrontation in which no strategy exists that allows any party to achieve victory. Any party initiating aggression might trigger their own demise.

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Trigger Happy
One of several meanings: Irresponsible in the use of firearms especially : inclined to shoot before clearly identifying the target.

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:+1:t2:Thanks, reminded me of the gun store by that name, where a friend of mine was employed back in the early '80s.


Found this photo I snapped(dated Aug 1984)…place was a little dark and had plenty of nostalgic decor. Was where I bought my 1st and only revolver. They folded up a few years later, it was a cool place. :sunglasses:

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“Jump the gun”, to do something too soon or before the right time. Phrase originated from track and field races and was known since the early 1900’s. Refers to athletes starting the race before the starting gun was fired. This phrase was preceded in America by “beat the gun”.

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Shoot off one’s mouth, shooting off at the mouth

Speak indiscreetly; also, brag or boast. [Slang; mid-1800s]

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Flash in the pan, comes to mind

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Slang for Gun

Welcome to the Slangpedia entry on guns! Here you’ll find a massive list of slang terms that can be used to refer to guns, and slang words that are related to guns.

  • Heat/heater: commonly used to describe a weapon of some kind, usually a pistol.
    • Usage: “You packing heat?”
    • Origin: 1932 W. R. BURNETT Silver Eagle i. 7 ‘He don’t even pack a heater.’ ‘Don’t what?’ ‘He don’t carry a gun.’
  • Gat: Came from shortening Gattling gun to just gat.
    • Usage: “I had to shut up: the dealers had gats, my boys didn’t.”
    • Origin: Was used during the prohibition era to name any gun, but specifically the thompson submachine gun, aka The Tommy Gun.
  • Strapped: You are considered “strapped” when you are in possession of a fire-arm.
    • Usage: “Step off, ’cause I’m fully strapped.”
    • Origin: Started off as a term to describe when you have a Mac 10 or some other semi machine gun or uzi on a strap hanging from your shoulder under your clothes.
  • Leng: Any type of weapon, i.e a knife or a gun.
    Can also be used in the word ‘lengman‘, i.e someone in possession of a weapon or someone who is dangerous.
    • Usage: “I saw them Hackney boys, so I pulled out my leng and started shooting at them”
    • Origin: The term is used mostly among London criminal underground network.
  • Hammer:
    • Usage: “i pulled the hammer on that guy and gave him a third eye”
    • Origin: The hammer is the part of the firearm that strikes the firing pin which in turn hits the primer and ignites the propellant that pushes the slug out of the barrel.
  • Burner: Any type of firearm, that has either been previously used in a crime, or has been stolen. You buy them for a very low price, use them once, and then throw them away.
    • Usage: “Take this burner for 85bucks. Nine bodies on it. Leave it or sell it quick.”
    • Origin: Likely has its roots in the fact that a firearm can get very hot when fired multiple times.
  • Cannon:
    • Usage: “He took a hard blow to the face before he could draw his cannon.”
    • Origin: Comes from the good old classical cannon.
  • Piece: A gun, firearm. (Licensed or unlicensed) Usually hidden under clothing for protection or criminal intentions.
    • Usage: “This piece shoots nice, only cost $50.
  • Handgun: a gun designed for use by one hand; a pistol.
    • Usage: “They drew their handguns simultaneously, both ready to shoot”
  • Hardware: One or more guns.
    • Usage: ” He’s carrying some serious hardware. “
  • Blaster: An unspecified powerful hand weapon, usually one that fires an energy pulse or beam.
    • Usage: “The blaster was loaded and ready, presumably aimed at the most unfortunate man in the room.”
  • Revolver: A pistol with revolving chambers enabling several shots to be fired without reloading.
    • Usage: “The revolver fired, ripping through the air into it’s target”
  • Rod: US slang name for pistol.
    • Usage: “The rod resembled a sign of freedom, for it’s ability to kill innocents without discussion or discourse.”
  • Persuader: A gun or other weapon used to compel submission or obedience.
    • Usage: “Silence fell over the congregation, discussion was no longer an option, the persuader had persuaded them.”
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It’s cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey. When cannon balls were iron and the “tray” they were stored on was brass. As the temperature dropped the brass would contract faster than the iron, causing them to fall off.

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“The whole/full nine yards”

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Bite the bullet. To approach a painful situation with fortitude. Most likely from when sailors/solders were flogged.

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image

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Someone that can be trusted is a “Straight Shooter”

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Buck Shot

1st Definition: A mixed drink that you chug out of a red bull can. The drink is made by punching a hole in the bottom of a red bull can, pouring out a minimal amount of red bull and filling the can with Bacardi 151 till it spills. You take the drink by placing your mouth over the punched hole and chugging it while opening the top of the Red Bull can for maximum flow.

2nd Definition: Term used to describe the action of crumpling up a dollar bill and throwing it at a stripper while she/he is on stage.

I couldn’t make this stuff up if I tried, Googled it. LOL :grimacing:

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If you say that someone ”shoots from the hip” you mean that they react to situations or give their opinion very quickly, without stopping to think…:boom::boom::boom:

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Shot down like a dog in the street”.
This expression means that someone killed a human with no more respect than if the victim had been an animal.

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