M*CARBO Brotherhood

Lever Action Rifles

I believe Marlin would be the best choice if you are thinking about mounting a scope on it. Comes already drilled and tapped for a scope mount and the Marlin’s side ejection presents less potential problems than a top ejection lever action. I have an old Marbles Game getter see thru scope mount on my Marlin 336 in 35rem. Works great for running shots on game. It can be a bit difficult to find moving deer through a scope, so I mount the rifle and look through the mount at the open sights and track the animal, then you only need raise your head slightly and the cross hairs will be right on them. My father used to have me practice this by tracking flying birds. With a little practice it is very effective. My record is dropping two running deer at 50 and 65 yds in under 10 seconds.

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I got the chance to shoot the Marlin 1895 GBL yesterday while at the range testing the Mcarbo Optics Mount. Another forum member met me there to test the optics mount and knew I was in the market for a 45/70 lever gun. He brought his along and let me take some shots with it. Really nice rifle which would serve my needs perfectly as a short, lightweight large caliber brush gun. A big thanks to @Dred for bringing it along and allowing me to shoot it.

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45/70, now that is a cartridge that says “I’m serious”. If it was good enough to hunt buffalo well over 100yrs ago, I’m sure it’ll handle anything you’re likely to encounter. You really should “pull the trigger” and get one.

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@Texprep … you are very welcome. Sorry I hadn’t gotten 'round to installing the RPP sighting rail and getting it on target. At least the POI is predictable @ 10" southwest of POA.

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All that mattered to me was being able to put it in my hands. Getting to shoot it was a bonus. Doesn’t matter it wasn’t sighted in, being able to see it hit the same P.O.I. everytime as long as you held the same P.O.A. is what’s important.

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as well as the 45/70 cartridge, to me is one of the easiest to reload. so many choices on 300 gr bullets and up. you can load either way black powder cartridge, or smokeless cartridge… always loved that round…

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year afore last, Knowing I could never afford much less abuse a original 1887 Winchester 12 gauge lever action shotgun and dispute the bad press about finish work, I bought a PW87 Norinco Lever shotgun. before i even shot it, tore it down and lapped alll the critical surfaces. 2 fingers brothers .all it takes to jack it hot or cold. smooth as butter. only thing i wat to add to it, is a big loop lever. which will be soon. most fun ive ever had with a 300$ shotgun. usually i take my browning A5 to turkey shoots, this past year, i took the PW, but I did pattern it :smiling_imp::smiling_imp::smiling_imp::smiling_imp::smiling_imp::smiling_imp:

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Well I decided to go with 16 inch rossi model 92 in 357. I prefer the 92 lock up.
Getting one from Steve’s guns. This way it’s already slicked up and tuned for reliability.

Plus I prefer the lighter weight of the rossi.

Cant wait to get it to the range

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If I where in the market for a new lever gun… Is there much difference in quality between brand currently. Marlin seems to be the go if buying new, assuming you dont care about a side loading gate.

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I like the Henry’s. model #H014S- 65 cal 6.5 creedmoor , sighted.$1,066.00
long ranger series

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Ask again in a year or two. The Marlins are not what they once were, but … the Remington shop is definitely getting the hang of lever building. But, today, I give the fit & finish nod to Henry. With the Henrys, the receivers are covered with a - well, it’s a receiver cover (gold, silver or blue - it’s a cover over the actual receiver).

Henry has released their first few side load/side eject rifles so that differentiation is not long for this world.

And both Browning and Henry build box fed lever guns to bring modern centerfire rifle calibers that aren’t tube mag friendly to the lever game.

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although this one would be extremely nice. I have a few lever guns, all pre 64 winchester, oldest being a 1912 production 1886 in 30 wcf, I also have a 50s production 1886 in 45/70 but this baby if i ever win the lotto will be in my stable.
1886 Winchester deluxe octagon case hardened 45/70 rifle.$1,739.99


but i would put a big loop,saddle ring and vernier tang sight on it…
but if i was to end up with a marlin, it would be in 35 Remington chamber…

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I second that @Texprep. Between the figured wood of the stock and that funky bluing/metal treatment, that is quite a striking firearm. @GOBLIN You sporting one of these?

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@chilipepper Ive got a older, 1950s 1886 45/70 dont have the case hardened finish, just a well worn blue finish, as well as a 1912 production 1886 30wcf lever gun, I get a kick out of it because it has the "new nickle steel barrel, made especially for smokeless powder "engraved on the barrel. its a work in progress…

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@GOBLIN Hey, nothing wrong with well worn blued, it’s a good look. :+1:

My time buck hunting in the dense mountain woods of PA was always with a .30-30 Winchester, excellent brush guns. One I used frequently belonged to my grandfather (not the one from the knife thread, though he served in WW2 as well) and I recall the stock being slightly smaller and it had a ring attached to the side of the receiver, almost looked like a saddle gun. Good stuff, and good memories of another very special person who impacted my life in a positive way. :slightly_smiling_face:

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I’m leaning towards a Henry chambered in 22lr with an octagon barrel. I just need to hit up the ol’ local gun store and pull the trigger on the purchase. Can shoot 22 all day with out breaking the bank. I was debating a pistol caliber, but still undecided.

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Boy, there’s truth in that sentence. Possibly like many here, a bolt action 22lr was my first step up from a BB gun when i was a kid as well as my first range firearm at Tuckahoe when I was in scouts. I suspect that gun is still lurking in the depths of one of my dad’s closets.

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That’s exactly why I got my Henry Golden Boy. I didn’t have a practical use for a lever gun so I wanted something I could shoot often.

It’s a beautiful gun and awesome to shoot. I’d still like a bigger caliber, probably .357 down the line, but for now it’s one of my favorites.

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I don’t have a practical use for one, but I sure do want a lever gun. I would have to use a pistol caliber to use at my local steel range. The 22 would only be for paper targets or out plinking. I see it as saved funds on ammo vs the fun of shooting moving steel targets. Such a 1st world problem.

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@Pew_Ding and @TheThreeLaws - that Golden Boy is a special case. Try one out before you decide. The stock angle definitely impacts cheek weld versus the H001 rifles. I don’t fit the Golden Boy as well as I fit the H001s.

22lr is what’s missing in my collection. While I was waiting for my custom serial numbered Evil Roy I decided that it should belong to a friend’s son. I’ve been on the hunt for a Remington Nylon 76.

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