Just tried out my new M*Carbo CNC Flat trigger and trigger spring kit!

I bought MCarbo’s CNC Flat Trigger and trigger spring kit. I installed the parts myself, and visited the range the other day, and I’m really impressed with the enhanced feel and operation of my Sig-Sauer P365. The trigger is nicely machined and finished with no sharp edges, and the flat surface is very comfortable. I really like the shorter throw, as well as the lighter pull from the new springs!

At the age of 72, I’m a neophyte shooter. So, with these enhancements I’m even more encouraged to be able to develop the necessary shooting skills more quickly.

I also enjoyed doing the installation, myself, as it gave me some good insight into how the gun works, and how the various parts interact.

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I visited my range yesterday, ffatampa.com, and talked to Travis, one of the trainers there, and I showed him my P365 with the MCarbo flat trigger and trigger spring kit. While dry-firing it to check out the trigger, he did something very interesting: My gun has the Sig Lima365 green laser attached, so he turned on the laser and put the dot on a “target” on the wall, keeping it steadily aimed at the spot while he slowly pulled the trigger. He was impressed with how little it moved. He also liked the smooth, lighter pull and shorter throw, especially compared with the Springfield Armory Hellcat trigger he also let me try on a gun he had at the counter.

I thought his use of a laser to evaluate the trigger pull was very smart, so I’m going to try using the laser with my own range practice to help me train keeping the gun steadily aimed at the target during my trigger pulls. It’s always on the gun, so I may as well use it more routinely for learning how to shoot better.

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I will second that use of laser during dry fire. I use a laser blank in the chamber and when i se the dot on the wall, im looking for jumps and streaks of light when it goes off. Even that little brief blink of a moment when it goes off you can see the direction of motion.
Keep it up brother! Glad to hear these fine Mcarbo products are working out for ya !

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Another take away from yesterday’s range visit: I just plain LIKE my P365!

I never checked out anything else, before I bought it. I just liked the whole concept of it, including the name. And now I’m liking more and more the way it shoots.

This is the first 9mm I’ve owned or shot, and I flinched some at the recoil at first. But I realize that’s just the way it is, and it’s really not bad at all. It’s actually starting to feel good!

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Thanks, Josh! I’m really impressed with my first MCarbo products. The big plus for me is that they’re in my home town, Clearwater, FL!

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I pocket carry my P365 almost daily in this recluse leather (horsehide) holster.

(upload://xTnobrtualCaLAOZjJs43twc6lI.jpeg)

Though it’s very durable, comfortable, and doesn’t print, its being one-sided leaves the gun exposed to my sweat soaking through my pants pocket. ![image|389x499]
So, I ordered Recluse’s two-sided version. See link:
https://recluseholster.com/sig-sauer-p365-recluse-ts-solo-1

Looks like a slick leather, and no hook to drag the pocket . Does the holster pull out of your pocket on draw, or does it let go of the gun ok??

When you reach for the gun, as your finger tips go between the leather side and the handle, the gun pivots sideways at its muzzle and off of the stiff foam stud surrounding the trigger. The stud guides your pointer finger up along the slide, and your other three fingers down below the trigger guard, all the while protecting the trigger as you get a good grip. By that time, the gun is free of the holster, which naturally stays in your pocket as you pull the gun up and out of your pocket. It’s very smooth and positive!

The leather is sturdy vegetable-tanned horsehide. Quality stuff!

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Great explanation. Thx​:+1::sunglasses:

So…your next step is to BUY one, right?! Just kidding, but my own decision to pocket carry also necessitated a “wardrobe change”, not only because of the need for dedicated pockets, but in my case a better way to support the added weight of weapon and extra mags.

I started out by buying Wrangler cargo pants from Wal-Mart. They were affordable, but looked like hell, and I didn’t like the velcro flaps on the extra pockets.

But then my son suggested 511Tactical.com. They have some great cargo pants: Made in Bangladesh, not China, stretch fabric and Teflon coated for stain resistance, zipper close pockets, multiple-section extra pockets, double stitching all over, and multiple colors. They’re expensive, but very much worth it. I currently have five pair. You have to air dry them to preserve the Teflon coating, but they dry quickly.

Another thing that I’ve done is to start using suspenders to hold everything up. I’m not extremely overweight, but I have a bit of “overhang” which wasn’t too terrible to deal with while I wore regular jean Wranglers. But then, as long as I was investing in new pants, I decided to go from 34 waist to 36 and pull them up a little higher over instead of under the overhang.

I didn’t want to use the common clip-on suspenders, as they were bound to tear up the waistband over time. So I went with the button type, and I sewed buttons inside the waistbands on all my pants. That’s worked well over the long term.

Another thing I did, in order to “balance” the look of the relative bulge of my gun in the right main pocket, is to buy the recluseholser, com mag pouch which holds two mags in a pouch made of the same horsehide as the holster. I carry two 12-round mags in the pouch in the left main pocket.

The extra weight I’m carrying now is admittedly non-trivial, but I’m used to it and honestly don’t notice it most of the time.