M*CARBO Brotherhood

Good Over Under Shotguns that will not break the bank

I have been considering getting back into clay pigeon and possibly trap shooting. I have always liked the over under shotguns, but do not want to spend a fortune. Some of the Turkish made shotguns look good, but not sure of their performance and durability. Any good suggestions?

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@em44052 i have a lamber over under i find ok not the most expensive gun

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@em44052 How Fun for You :+1: I’ve got a Old Ruger Over&Under it Works,I Still Miss my ‘‘Silver Snipe’’

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I am a qualified CPSA instructor here in the UK ( Google it, CPSA not me lol), i will however say what ever suits your budget, and as long as it goes bang, ( just make sure which ever you choose is fitted correctly for you ( yes it makes a difference) other wise it may go bang but you will not hit much) just saying.

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I would also recommend if you are taking up Clay shooting get some initial professional instruction as bad habits will happen and you will then find it difficult to hit the clays.

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Hi John, Any suggestions on how to choose a shotgun that correctly fits? Is it different from picking a rifle?

@John025 I used to be pretty good at clay shooting and trap. I knew a member at a skeet and trap club and went quite often. That has been a while and would need to basically start over I believe.

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Nothing wrong with a lesson to refresh the brain, yes it costs but if you have a good instructor they will set you on the right path to smash those clays, also shoot those disciplines your bad at, it will improve you over all and get you out of your comfort zone, only way you will learn.

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Sorry missed your asking about shot gun fitting, if your instructor or gun salesperson ( wouldn’t go for the latter though unless they are the instructor and see everything about you, stance, size etc), is worth their salt they will consider all the factors ( and there are many), it is a rather in-depth process ( should not be about cost when getting a gun to fit though, buying any gun no matter the price should include a free fit or recommendation for one).
Basic Main one is stock length though, my advice is no more or less than 2-3 fingers between your nose and your thumb when you hold the gun ( bear in mind this also depends on your instructor ensuring your stance is correct) CPSA instructors over here, work on feet first and then work upwards for the rest of the body. It would take up most of this web site for me to go in-depth trust me… It isn’t a complicated process hence my saying get a good instructor use their guns to get a basic idea on fit and get good advice, nothing worse than spending money on something that isn’t right… Also its never the gun that misses, its always you.

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and no rear site on a shotgun that’s your eye lol hence my advice on gun fit

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These are just suggestions… carefully qualify your needs and budget… how do you plan to use the shotgun…which gauge suits your needs best (12,16,20,28, OR .410) How much can you realistically afford… ( it’s easy to over spend when faced with so many choices)… read reviews and gather owner info… Go to Academy or the store of your choice and hold a few in person so you wont be suprised(or disappointed) later on. Don’t get in a hurry (I know… it’s hard!!) Due diligence pays off. Turkey is now the shotgun manufacturing center of the world… they are less-expensive for one main reason… 1 US DOLLAR EQUALS 8.5 TURKISH LIRA.

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@manicmecanic @John025 Great Suggestions and Point’s Made ! :+1:
When the Light Came on for Me as to gun fit, Was when The sight plane looked like’ I was looking down the Flight deck of a Carrier’ and the Golden Bead at the end was Magnificent. :slightly_smiling_face:

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I shot competitive clays for close to 4 decades. And the one thing that has remained true over that 40 years is you get what you pay for. I’ve owned O/U shotguns made by Winchester, Browning, Remington and Beretta. I have shot, in competition, Krieghoff, Perazzi, Yildz, Hatsan, Ruger, CZ and ATA O/Us. So here’s my take.
Very expensive shotguns are works of art but don’t improve your game any. The Turkish value market O/Us just are not going to hold up especially if you intend to compete. The one exception would be CZ. They make a good O/U and only seem to be improving. Of the Winchester, Browning, Remington and Beretta O/Us I owned all had some sort of breakage except for the Browning. I have two Skeet grade Citoris in 12 and 20 gauge with tens of thousand of rounds through them with not one failure. Brownings are not super cheap but nor are they extravagantly expensive. The old saying is “Brownings don’t wear out they just wear in.” I agree with that.
Now over the last two decades the real paradigm shift in shotguns has been in semi-auto shotguns. The strides in reliability are almost if not as good as todays good O/U. And they kick way less then any O/U. Finally if there are stoppage issues most can be self repaired. My pick is the Beretta A400. The price is just under the good O/U prices and it will make shooting a 200 clay session a lot less fatiguing.

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John, I agree with you wholeheartedly. I am also a sporting clays instructor and can’t over emphasize the need for proper stock fit. Without it, success can be limited. I usually recommend that folks that are new to the game, (if they already have purchased a gun) to go to their local skeet/trap/ sporting clays range and find a qualified instructor. Not only will it improve their game, but he can usually make knowledgeable suggestions on stock fit. They can then hunt down a local smithy to make it happen.
M. Hall

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“It’s Hard To Hit If The Gun Don’t Fit”!

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Like the Stoeger. Got a SxS the other year, double triggers, 12g, choke tubes. Really liked it. Fit me right away, although not everyone will be that lucky. Found out my dad had 2 O/Us - one in 12, one in .410 - and they come up right. Haven’t fired them, though.

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