M*CARBO Brotherhood

Falsehoods And Myths

@Squidder_K Hey Kevin I feel like I am over doing the long posts so I will let this old fart do the talking. :grin::+1:

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 Budgets are one of the biggest impediments to adequate training. For too many Depts the frequency and nature of their "qualifications" are designed more to cover the ass, liability wise, of the administration than to really train their people to a high level of proficiency. For those of us not satisfied with the basic level of training afforded by our Depts, it was left up to us, and at our own expense, to practice. My Dept gave us one box of ammo per month to shoot on our own. Not nearly enough, but at least it was something. Like I said, any more than that was at our expense. I looked at the added expense sort of like I looked at the monthly insurance premiums I had to pay. I was investing in my protection.
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@Dane your post came out weird and difficult to read. (One continous scrolling line?) Can you repost it please?

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I don’t know why that happens sometimes. I just happens occasionally, I’m not doing anything different. Not sure how I change it to normal format.

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@Dane I did get from the first part you were talking about budgets being an impediment to training cycles?

I do agree with you 100% on that. Besides budgets their is the issue of logistics and dealing with a group of individuals of varying abilities. (As a teacher I can attest to the fact that we only actually “teach” 1/3 of any given group or class.)

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Budgets are one of the biggest impediments to adequate training. For too many Depts the frequency and nature of their “qualifications” are designed more to cover the ass, liability wise, of the administration than to really train their people to a high level of proficiency. For those of us not satisfied with the basic level of training afforded by our Depts, it was left up to us, and at our own expense, to practice. My Dept gave us one box of ammo per month to shoot on our own. Not nearly enough, but at least it was something. Like I said, any more than that was at our expense. I looked at the added expense sort of like I looked at the monthly insurance premiums I had to pay. I was investing in my protection.

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Oh my you just triggered an old memory. Back in the early 90s I would buy up all of the training ammo given to the BP agents (.357 125gr JHP) for about 1/3 of cost. :flushed:

Look good shooters are good shooters. They get that way through frequent training. My wife complains about how her skill level drops after just a 3-montn lay off from competition over the holidays and she is right.

I think what Logan was alluding to was the guys who show up, criticize competition as “not being tactical” and then don’t shoot. (They always have lots of excuses.)

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“Excuses” - Those who try so hard to look the part rarely step up to the plate when asked to demonstrate their skills. Generally, the more “tacticool” they look, the lower their actual skillset. However, they are very quick to impart their vast knowledge to anyone around. We’ve all seen these guys who like to hang out at gun stores and just love to talk the talk. Don’t see them so much at the range.

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@Dane you nailed that brother. All these “shooters” i work with are never at the range and never shooting but they sure have no problem talking about how badass they are. :roll_eyes::joy: any time I ask them to come to the range it’s an excuse on why they can’t. I literally have a gun in my hand training every single day whether it’s on the range or at my house dry firing or doing holster work. I haven’t always been like this but my skillset skyrocketed once I started putting in the work :+1:t2:

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AAAAAAGGGGGGHHHHH!! :rage: :rage: My favorite myth to hate!!

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A job that is good therapy!! :thinking:

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Have found that good shooting skills (grip,sighting,stance,moving) is highly perishable. NAH, ain’t gonna blame it on age!! :joy:

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I used to train a lot of troops just by using the dime/washer test on an M-16 and that would make a huge difference in their ability to shoot/qualify. Most were not shooters, only what the Army/NG made them do.

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I like the looks on peoples faces when the cashier asks how you would like to pay and you pull out silver.
They say we can not accept that. We can take money or credit cards. Then you try to explain the obvious and they freak out.

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John I know this is not the thread to discuss this but I can not find the thread you had that talked about the Japanese M11. I was watching Military History Channel and saw Maj Stephen MgGeorge firing it.

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Those who are supposedly in an office of importance who quite frankly don’t know jack diddly squat about firearms trying to pass laws on firearms. Along with Physcians who claim their “college” is against firearms…but hey you can allow all manners of quaks to continue to “practice.”
Here is a clue folks, the disease influenza will kill 200,000-400,000 people this year, but I don’t see any of you maggots standing up to attack that one. RSV will kill 14,000 Americans this year, C-Diff, another infectious disease, will kill 25,000 and infect aver 435,000. Where is the outrage at those numbers? And many of these could be prevented.

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@Squidder_K
I can expand on your example. It has been well and thoroughly documented that over 200,000 people per year die in the US as a result of preventable medical errors. More recent studies put the number between 250,000 and 400,000. The roughly 11,000 homicides by firearm per year pales in comparison to that number. Indeed, if preventable medical error were a disease, it would be the third leading cause of death in the U.S. just behind heart disease and cancer. Makary M. A., Medical error—the third leading cause of death in the US, BMJ 353:i2139 (2016). Accepting only the lower end of the estimate, we still are talking about a quarter of a million preventable deaths – more than 22 times the total number of firearm homicides per year. A mere 10% decrease in those deaths would save more than DOUBLE the lives lost to firearm homicides each year.

But while the AMA and other medical organizations self-righteously proclaim the need for firearm regulation, there is no clamor for increased oversight and regulation of the medical profession. You hear absolutely no demand from physicians, hospitals or other practitioners to address the butchery within their own blood-stained halls. Instead, they spend millions of dollars fighting relentlessly and misleadingly for Tort Reform and other laws to protect them from the consequences of their negligence and to limit the rights of those they have victimized and deny them fair compensation.

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@JoeFridaySays Joe it worse than that: 200K-400K is the average, now take the fact that there are around 1,000,000 Practicing Medical Doctors. With those numbers every doctor in the US will statistically kill someone or be involved with a medical error every 2.5-5 years. Have an MD with 20 years of experience and their score would be low end 4 high end 10 statistically (FYI this does not mean your family practioners has offed between 4-10 patients). This is a numbers thing not an actual indicator. Not all MD’s were the guilty party, many times it may be a pharmacy fault, nursing error, or something else. For those of you wanting to know where the info comes form, it comes from the Centers for Disease Control aka the CDC.

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Joe, when was the last time Doctors recommended Doctors for Jail time. You have to be really jacked up and have gone out and molested a minor, while committing unauthorized medical research, after slicing and dicing half a village in some third world country. He’ll, I doubt the AMA would recommend Joseph Mengele for any type of disciplinary actions, unless of course he used his Lugar to commit any of those offenses.

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