Falsehoods And Myths

#41

@Squidder_K Hey Kevin I feel like I am over doing the long posts so I will let this old fart do the talking. :grin::+1:

6 Likes
#42
 Budgets are one of the biggest impediments to adequate training. For too many Depts the frequency and nature of their "qualifications" are designed more to cover the ass, liability wise, of the administration than to really train their people to a high level of proficiency. For those of us not satisfied with the basic level of training afforded by our Depts, it was left up to us, and at our own expense, to practice. My Dept gave us one box of ammo per month to shoot on our own. Not nearly enough, but at least it was something. Like I said, any more than that was at our expense. I looked at the added expense sort of like I looked at the monthly insurance premiums I had to pay. I was investing in my protection.
1 Like
#43

@Dane your post came out weird and difficult to read. (One continous scrolling line?) Can you repost it please?

4 Likes
#44

I don’t know why that happens sometimes. I just happens occasionally, I’m not doing anything different. Not sure how I change it to normal format.

3 Likes
#45

@Dane I did get from the first part you were talking about budgets being an impediment to training cycles?

I do agree with you 100% on that. Besides budgets their is the issue of logistics and dealing with a group of individuals of varying abilities. (As a teacher I can attest to the fact that we only actually “teach” 1/3 of any given group or class.)

3 Likes
#46

Budgets are one of the biggest impediments to adequate training. For too many Depts the frequency and nature of their “qualifications” are designed more to cover the ass, liability wise, of the administration than to really train their people to a high level of proficiency. For those of us not satisfied with the basic level of training afforded by our Depts, it was left up to us, and at our own expense, to practice. My Dept gave us one box of ammo per month to shoot on our own. Not nearly enough, but at least it was something. Like I said, any more than that was at our expense. I looked at the added expense sort of like I looked at the monthly insurance premiums I had to pay. I was investing in my protection.

5 Likes
#47

Oh my you just triggered an old memory. Back in the early 90s I would buy up all of the training ammo given to the BP agents (.357 125gr JHP) for about 1/3 of cost. :flushed:

Look good shooters are good shooters. They get that way through frequent training. My wife complains about how her skill level drops after just a 3-montn lay off from competition over the holidays and she is right.

I think what Logan was alluding to was the guys who show up, criticize competition as “not being tactical” and then don’t shoot. (They always have lots of excuses.)

5 Likes
#52

“Excuses” - Those who try so hard to look the part rarely step up to the plate when asked to demonstrate their skills. Generally, the more “tacticool” they look, the lower their actual skillset. However, they are very quick to impart their vast knowledge to anyone around. We’ve all seen these guys who like to hang out at gun stores and just love to talk the talk. Don’t see them so much at the range.

5 Likes
#53

@Dane you nailed that brother. All these “shooters” i work with are never at the range and never shooting but they sure have no problem talking about how badass they are. :roll_eyes::joy: any time I ask them to come to the range it’s an excuse on why they can’t. I literally have a gun in my hand training every single day whether it’s on the range or at my house dry firing or doing holster work. I haven’t always been like this but my skillset skyrocketed once I started putting in the work :+1:t2:

4 Likes
#54

AAAAAAGGGGGGHHHHH!! :rage: :rage: My favorite myth to hate!!

1 Like
#55

A job that is good therapy!! :thinking:

2 Likes
#56

Have found that good shooting skills (grip,sighting,stance,moving) is highly perishable. NAH, ain’t gonna blame it on age!! :joy:

2 Likes