Be Careful Out There

#21

LMAO …

I will admit that cowboys become indistinguishable from the cowgirls when we see snow in my little piece of Texas.

I was 16 the one time I tried busting a curfew because it was snowing and I’d built my Mustang to maximize acceleration. My father told me to check my balls. I was clueless. He directed me to grab’m and I told him my hands were freezing. So, he exclaimed that meant they were still attached and to get me black #$@ home. I kept trying and the result was having him meet me on the side of the hilly country roads I’d called from. I thought he was picking me up and bid farewell to my gf who had already made arrangements to put me up.

Well, he was waiting at the agreed upon parking lot. He did not let me get out of my car and explained that I built it so I better be able to drive it. It was clear my future driving privelidges were riding on me making the pass. Well, I learned most of what I know about managing limited traction on the trip home with pops following in his fwd accord. I made it home and I’ve never been stuck in ice or snow. I’ve actually done many, many rescues. Pops is a cool dude!

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#22

Best way to learn, by doing it. Course a little pressure (like losing driver privileges) always helps.

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#23

Last February I got in the middle of a 33 car pileup on I580 in whiteout conditions. It was perfectly clear but suddenly a light snow went from flurries to accumulation then whiteout. I had started slowing already but most just kept flying on by freeway speed. Come around a downhill curve and it was a complete freak show of cars doing pinwheels everywhere. I was skidding but had already slowed way down. Big difference losing control at 55 than 25. I managed to stop safely by the right freeway barrier while cars crashed all around me, you could see and hear the crashes. Got away without a scratch. That’s my black Vamoosh!

Later it was reported the original cause of the pileup was a NHP Trooper who was ticketed for his fault, along with a half dozen other drivers.

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#24

best way to learn to be put in the thick of it ,do or die @Dred @Boomchucker @cico

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#25

watched the short video lucky you were not killed or seriously hurt @Boomchucker

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#26

Ya’ll do know that too much exposure to that much snow will rot yer brain! That’s why I live down south-we only get to see it once in a blue moon! And that’s when I stay home for the entire duration!

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#27

@SnuffySmiff lol There is 2’ here in the yard now, it will get deeper and it won’t be gone until April. I take my rotten brain and strap long boards to my feet and hurtle myself down slopes at 40 - 50 mph to pass the time. :smiley: On the upside The lawn won’t need to be mowed until early May lol.

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#28

So Dave, with all that fresh stuff on the ground, did you get to the MAILBOX yet ?

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#29

My son grew up in Wisconsin about 25 south of GREEN BAY. I live in ohio but went up there during football season to record all his games.
If weather permitted I would take him to a frozen (large) parking lot and teach him how to control slides and the such. We would start out by picking a spot to stop at. Then get up to speed had to do at least one 360 and stop as close to the chosen spot. HE LOVED IT.

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#30

@TriggerHappy

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#31

@SnuffySmiff “great balls of fire”! younses forgot the Twinkies!!!

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#32

a couple of inches of snow here last night early this morning so i left home at 230 am for work at 7am stuck the shovel in back of car thankfully i didnt need it i travel 53 miles around 90 km to work each day no photos coz it was dark , got to work ok snow and ice forcasted till saturday so depending on how bad i will sleep on the job if need be

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#33

i can jus picture you in that hot tub :joy: @Boomchucker

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#34

@hunter1916 what is your commute like ? Is it from a rural area to a city or is it all city travel? Do you have to deal with a lot of traffic or hills? All my life I have lived in area that has snow on the ground more or less form Thanksgiving to Easter (upwards of 5 feet where I am at now) except for the ten years I lived in the Seattle area and I would stay home the rare occasion it snowed there even though I had a four wheel drive just out of the shear terror of all the people there that have no snow driving skills and Seattle is very hilly. :fearful:

I have witnessed this exact sort of chaos!

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#35

:rofl::sweat:

Here is one from russia. Watch for the guy geting out of the car while moving

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#36

Abandon ship hahahaha! The commuter chaos is always in 1 or 2 inches of snow in places that don’t get much. No skills and rain tread tires = disaster. In places that get a lot of snow there is a very convenient, relatively soft plow berm that keeps you on the road if need be lol. I have a 35 year old AWD Honda that thinks it’s a snowmobile and will pull itself through 20" of fresh snow so well you have to not go too fast because the snow rolling over the hood would obscure the windshield and you can’t see. :smiley: :+1: Studded Hankook snow tires are like putting talons on your car. :+1:

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#37

Not a severe incident but freaky none the less.
I lived on a research farm of VaTech durring the summer of ‘76 it was located in Orange,Va.
I bicycled everywhere I went (had no car) about 400-450/wk.
One Saturday morning after doing chores (I managed a weather station) i left for Charlottesville to play on UVa campus.
Nice sunny morning with a strong cross wind out of the west and I am going south on Rt 15(nice flat 4 lane road), fighting a stiff 20mph wind. I am in a tight tuck position riding the white line when I hear the hummmm of a diesel coming up on me. A moment after that a 11/4" chromed head carriage bolt appears about 6" off my left knuckles. It was the front bumper of a Continental Trailways bus going about 65mph.
All you ex truckers and well seasoned drivers of cars know the BIG holes and the high/low air pressure wakes that are created.
When the bus passed me it sucked me in to the middle of the lane then spit me out into the shoulder about 10’. I unbuckle from my pedals and get back on the road.
I get down to this little town of Gordonsville and turn west onto Rt33small2 lane road. Now I am going into a headwind, still in tight tuck position looking at the white line, occasionally looking up.
Low an behold I look up and oncoming are 2 pickup trucks racing at me.This time the wind is going the same direction but the distance between me and 60mph oncoming traffic within a foot of me was a little disconcerting.

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#38

That sounds like a real close call. Under the right conditions in a small car you can tuck in behind a big rig and throw it in neutral and be pulled along for free :+1:

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#39

Nice to have a heated snowmobile ?

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#40

@TriggerHappy its mostly rural to aedge of city i live up a small mountain and just a cople of other hill then mostly flat so not so bad i dont have a 4 wheel drive just a hyundi i30 estate front wheel drive i always take it handy in snow and ice

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