Any Reloaders Out There?

Cleaner and a more complete burn.

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I just got an ammo can full of 45ACP ammo.
Headstamp WCC 84 it is red rimmed.
Appears to be Western Cartridge Co
and I guess it would have been made in 1984.
Anyone know what the overall weight should be? It’s coming in at 318gr +/-
OAL 1.266.
Also have TZZ 82 & 89. Do you know anything about these loads?

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Typically anything with a date on the headstamp is a pain to reload, my experience plan on reaming the pockets. If it’s factory WCC should be GTG shooting wise, any date. If they are re-loads weighing the cartridge will not give you any useful information, brass and bullet probably vary in weight more then the relatively tiny charge weight.
I’ll weigh some of my civilian 45 reloads today post back later.

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I find weighing ammo to be mostly pointless unless checking for light throws, or .22 rimfire match competition.

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Can’t even check for light throws unless you weighed your brass first. I weighed some 45ACP when I was out in the shop, 322 to 326 grains. there is about 4.7 grains of powder in there, and the spread was 4 grains. Pretty sure the 322 gr rounds have just as much powder as the 326 gr rounds. Mixed civilian large primer brass.
We really hit the wall with this when loading some 300 weatherby mag, the weatherby brass weighed more then the RP and and had enough of a volume difference to make 100 fps difference. I’ll see if I can find the data, first we were bumming on the spread and then started digging.

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Here it is

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I have a bit of reloading dilemma. Approx. 14 years ago I purchased a Remington 700 Titanium rifle barrel chambered in 30.06 from an individual on ebay. He and his brother had lived in Arizona and had done quite a bit of long range shooting before it was as popular as it is today. He had since moved to Atlanta and was in residency(?) to be a doctor when I met him and bought the barrel. As he wasn’t going to be shooting any more 30.06 any time soon, he then gifted me probably 800 rounds of 30.06 reloads he and his brother had worked up. Some of it is loaded with high dollar projectiles and powder. He seemed very knowledgeable on the subject of reloading (in training to be a doctor so he wasn’t exactly stupid) but he did state some of it was pretty hot. I have yet to shoot a single round.
So, I need to do something with all of it. What is the group’s consensus? Should I even bother trying to shoot it or should I start pulling it all down and reloading it?

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If you have any doubts about what you’re shooting, you should remove that doubt before proceeding.
It’s your responsibility to shoot safely.

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Weigh a cross section of them. then tear down an equal number and weigh the individual components . see how they compare
then tear down the rest of them to be safe.
that is what i would probably do.

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Did he give you any data on them? If I were confident on the powder I would pull, dump, and re-fill. If I wasn’t confident on the powder I would toss it. If they are “Hot” they are likely compressed and you will have to dig the powder out.
I really like the hornady camlock puller in a single stage press, seems easier on the projectile then the RCBS type die puller and a less force to operate. for 800 rounds it would be worth getting set up right. Hopefully it is properly sized so you don’t have to loose the primers.
Get a Lee Factory Crimp die to re-crimp, less chance of messing up the already sized and crimped once neck.

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I would tear it all down for bullets and brass. Since you have no idea how it’s loaded, don’t shoot it. Why take a chance with your rifle, or more importantly, your life?

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Being fairly new to reloading I learned a valuable lesson this week. I reloaded 1k rounds of 223 with HPBT bullets, checking the powder drop every 30 rounds with my Lee balance beam scale. When I was done I checked the overall weight with a new digital scale my wife bought me for Christmas. The more I checked the more variances I found. It left me wondering if there was something wrong with the powder drop that could vary that much. After checking all 1k I separated the heaviest and lightest 25 of each, took them apart and weighed each component. Turns out the 223 brass cases varied in weight from 88 gns to 102 gns depending on the manufacturer. Lesson learned and in the process I learned my Lee powder drum drop and balance beam scale are pretty accurate when checked against the digital scale. All good.

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When you start reloading for a little more accuracy, separate by headstamp and then by weight. Weight is a fair indicator of case volume. At 100 yards your 14 grains of difference probably won’t be noticeable. Might want to check out my “rookie Mistake” post 8 days ago about the 300WBY Mag if you haven’t already, in that gun brass variations made 100FPS difference.

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You are not alone. I learned this shortly after I started reloading as well.

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Hey brothers,

I may need an education upgrade on this. Do I need to care about cartridge brass weight ?

I thought if the projectiles were sorted by weight and the powder loads were identical in weight, I should be getting consistent results. Of course the overall cartridge length changes the internal pressure and needs to be optimized for the throat of the bore too.

Thanks !

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Depends on what caliber and what you are doing with it.
I wouldn’t worry about it for pistol caliber or anything for shooting under 100 yards or so, comes into play when you want to squeeze a little more accuracy out of a load. I do sort my 44 mag brass by length and weight, and my Magnum 45 Colt, but have never worried about 223 or 9/40/45.

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Tried to match up some 9mm by weight after my cat knocked over my case of 100 9mm ladder loads. Ended losing a bit of sleep and pulled and reloaded them over again. Luckily they were all the same powder.

If I was in your shoes, I’d pull them and load to what you like. Better to be safe then sorry.

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I’m going to give .22lr a go. Been rounding up the various stuff needed for the past couple months, and with the holiday sales I got my furnace. I expect a slow, tedious process, and a bit of frustration along the way. .380 is the smallest round I’ve loaded to date, and it seems tiny after a run of 30-06. Read mixed reviews and results so I don’t expect any match grade stuff coming out, at first anyway. There is one more item I’d like to get, a resizing die. Probably next month on that item.
22lr Reloader

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Are you going to pour your own bullets?
I just noticed it came with a mold.

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Yup, the .22 has a specific type of heel, not aware of any other source than casting my own. The mold is a single 38gr and a 20 something gr. I’ll be using 99.9% pure lead.

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