Any Reloaders Out There?

My opinion, Lee makes great dies and the rest of their line is so so. I have the Hornady electronic powder measure but in a lot of cases use the Pacific and a trickler. Getting the electronic scale adjusted for extruded powders is time consuming. Only get it out if I’m running a hundred or more rounds.

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I have the RCBS Competition powder measure and it is very accurate. Heads and tails above my Lee powder measure (which I never use anymore).

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Just finished sizing 2k of 9mm, on a single stage rc. I really really wish I had a progressive press. But I make due with what I have. Also didn’t know why I never noticed this, but my lee quick trim die is for 9mm mak :neutral_face:. So if anyone needs a lee quick trim die for 9mm mak let me know.

Also worked up some loads for 6.5CM, will be able to test most of the powders and all the projectiles I have. And BLM land just opened up recently, so I can make it out sometimes to test it all out. Going to wait a bit to let it die down a bit.

Question for all you. I have a standard chrono (comp electronic dlx), do you guys mostly just get velocities and es/sd’s or do you go for accuracy while chronoing? Since I’m shooting through the chrono is there a problem about changing targets and missing the chrono (like spacing the target every 6 inches or so)? Never done this before so that’s why I’m asking.

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I never trim 9mm no need.
Chrono make up your different powder loads in batches of say 6 or so and set up your chrono at correct distance from the muzzle, and target at distance you intend to shoot those loads at (vary target distance if you shoot at different distances).
If your batches are consistent your velocity will be similar for that batch and subsequent batches of the same size weight and powder.
No matter the distance you shoot at, the target accuracy depends on the loads you made, this is the dark art of reloading to find that sweet spot. Also what works in 1 gun doesn’t equate to another that’s the fun and frustration.

Added this Shooting Tip - Chronographing Correctly - YouTube

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I asked recently if any one had data for 357 180gr lead.
Realised yesterday I’m so dumb, and forgot basic reloading if you cant find the data use the next size up and start at the minimum recommended start point for that. If that fails to yield data then I also forgot as per the Hodgdon and Berry’s reloading site, you can use data for any similar bullet e.g. for 180gr lead use the data for 180gr FMJ or TMJ bullet as the cast lead has less pressure.
or oppositely load copper at mid range FMJ or higher Lead loads.

I will have myself chained to the nearest fence and publicly whipped for forgetting that .

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Check out this bad boy (though I wonder what could possibly go wrong) Lyman Products Mark 7 Evolution 10-Stage Loading MachineThe Firearm Blog

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I think there is a giveaway for that set up and one set of lyman dies. I’ll search for the link.

Here’s the link:

Lyman giveaway

Thanks for the chrono tips. I’d say 90% of my 9mm doesn’t need trimming, but 10% have been well over .754" longest one I had was around .790" these were all from onced fired brass I bought earlier this year. How they chambered and fired is beyond me.

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Yeah its also free to win on https://www.youtube.com/user/gavintoobe on his reloading channel, I added a chrono use link in the chrono reply after you liked it so recheck the reply i made. But here it is again Shooting Tip - Chronographing Correctly - YouTube

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Yep got that chrono vid. 3 Windows better then 2, well heck let’s go for 4 Windows lol. Good info and thanks!

Here is another question. When do you stop? Wild variations in velocities without pressure signs? Stuff like that. I know what to look for in over pressure signs, but nothing besides that.

And again thanks for helping this noob out lol.

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With a radar type you can do both, but for a downrange type chrony maybe concentrate on just not shooting it, low or zero magnification. Running 2 or 3 ladders through a chrony is a lot of work in itself. Non-shooting helper really helps either way.

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John I sent a PM give me a little more detail

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Brownells has small rifle primers 2000 and a $75 gift card for $200

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What uses SRP? 223? 25

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@cico7

Yes .223/5.56. Some 6.8 spc. Several different calibers.

With my taxes $254.66 delivered subtract out the gift card and it’s under .09/ primer

Here’s the link

https://www.brownells.com/reloading/primers/rifle-primers/rifle-primers-prod79080.aspx

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I have used it in place of SPP before. That is a pretty good deal except shipping and haz mat fees suck the life right out of them, [just complaining]
If I hadnt just ordered some SPP from Midway.

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Yeah I hear you about the fees. Midway is a little cheaper but they only let you buy one brick. I’ve been waiting on them to have srp and lrp in stock for a while now. Finding them locally is a joke for me if they have them it’s still $200 a brick.

I haven’t used much srp but I bought a bunch of 6.8 brass that was small primer so that’s what I got them for. I’ll be set for a while until prices and availability get better hopefully.

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@MrMachinist I agree, cant find any locally. It’s bad when you are already getting charged 2x the rate but adding the s&h makes it pucker a little more.

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Stick to loads in the books, do not go over the recommended powder rate or MIN MAX OAL. You are not doing long bench rest competitive shooting, so you wont need to dabble with anything except published loads…

Don’t use other peoples reload data, we all have different guns etc, and what works in one may not work in another.

Also just because you can load up to MAX recommended loads doesn’t mean they are accurate, in fact often they are not. start low n work up in tenths of a grain increment.
Reloading is a dark art and often frustrating, but worthwhile in the end.
Just be methodical and clean in the reload area and never do different reloads for different calibres at the same time load them up, and clear away and get in to the habit of emptying your powder measure after each session back into the correct tub, its easy to walk away and forget what powder you have been using, and clean it.
My friend just recently had an accident by mixing powder types, didn’t clean the measure out properly and mixed powders, fortunately it wasn’t too serious just blew his extractor away form the bolt.
lesson he wont forget again.

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Excellent advice! Couldn’t have said it better.

This one is especially true. I reload for something like 18 different calibers. Only my 7mm mag likes max loads and only when using 139gr. Bullets. Also pay attention if there is a minimum load. Some powders will create higher pressures at low powder charges. The powder I use for one of my .243 loads comes to mind. I have shown it below along with the warning to not use charges below those listed.


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As in Remington 7mm mag? Does it like Hornady #2825 seeds? (139gr BTSP)

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