Aluminum cased ammo?

Yes you need a hunting license & coyotes same applies. We can hunt hogs 24/7 365 days a year.

2 Likes

I’ve never looked into WI laws on night hunting. And I don’t want to because I’ve seen the price of night/thermal optics lol

1 Like

You can’t take it with you because someone will dig you up. I just put a little away every month till I could afford thermal optics. They can run but they can’t hide, It has more uses than hogs if you catch my hint.

3 Likes

Shhh. Dont give away the plan…:sweat_smile:

3 Likes

I was wondering that too. Is that common only for indoor ranges? Or outdoor as well?
I can understand not allowing jacketed, iron core, armor piercing bullets. Would be especially hard on indoor ranges, I’m guessing. lol

4 Likes

My indoor range bans all the steel bullets (checks box with a magnet), but they let me use the steel cased ones.

I would never try it again, the grime that they left inside my magazine… at some point the added friction blocked even the mag spring to feed the next round!

4 Likes

Steel core and steel cases are often confused and because someone
doesn’t know any better they apply the rule across the board.

Steel core ammo can cause more damage to traps, targets cables and
have a better chance of ricochet or sparks starting a fire than brass
or lead bullets. At my range it could penetrate the backstop at the pistol
range. Our rules do not permit rifles at the pistol range.

Steel case or cartridges get mixed with brass and harder to separate.
Harder maybe but not necessarily prohibitive. Magnets still pull steel
cases. Aluminum case for the same reason, harder to seperate.

The 2 pay ranges I occasionally use do not sell the brass to customers,
maybe they just sell it to recyclers.

6 Likes

Ive never been to an indoor range that allows steel cases or cores. Both are expressly prohibitted.

3 Likes

I have used a lot of Al cased ammo in several different cal revolvers and semi autos. Never a failier of any kind.

2 Likes

Ive never been to a range indoor or out. But ive read something somewhere about the steel case and steel core not being allowed indoor ranges because of chance of spark and with all the unburned powder moving around the air it would be potentially like a flour fireball if sparked. Ill see if i can find the article again.

2 Likes

Truth is… ranges make money off brass only, any steel mixed in devalues it. It’s only financial. If it did start fires the range was designed poorly with inappropriate material. My range does not allow steel… though I see it on the floor every visit. Guess what? Zero fires.

5 Likes

Yes, it is a finical gain for them and the steel undercuts that value.
The truth is that ANY hot enough casing/ember will cause more of a small “flash in the pan” on the floor only if they don’t clean the place. It won’t cause a raging inferno/fire to happen, but it (flashes) does happen. There is usually no trace after vacuuming and the best place to see if it has happen at any indoor range is the booths along the walls with any sound dampening coating. The bottom is sometimes slightly burnt in less than well kept places.

Maintained ranges all over the country for many years and seen some wild $hit in them and happen to them :scream::exploding_head::face_vomiting::sunglasses::rofl: (each emoji represents an emotion felt when working at some locations)

4 Likes

Seriously!? You are blessed!
I have heard a number of stories of unburned powder going off and creating havoc.
Happened at the local indoor police range.

4 Likes

I used to think that, but…
Steel recycling prices make me think theres always someone willing to dispose of it. Minimal effort, since a magnet makes sorting pretty quick.
If math is my friend today, it looks like 9mm casings are about 120pcs/lb. Wouldnt take long to collect enough to make a trip to the scrapyard worthwhile. Or like we have at the shop, the yards will send someone to collect it.
Just some thoughts.

4 Likes

@TexasEskimo Since you brought it up…

I used to shoot at a range in suburban Atlanta. The bullet trap/berm at the end of the lanes was ground up tires. Apparently that’s pretty common. Some joker brought tracer rounds into the range and the resulting fire was pretty bad. Smoke damage, everything soaked by the sprinklers. The range never reopened. Not while I lived there anyway.

I asked if they would sell me any of the guns as-is. They said the insurance company officially owned them all and they were not permitted to sell anything after the fire. I always wondered where those guns went. It was not a small shop.

5 Likes

@Dung There is a range here in Tullahoma TN near me that has a berm made of ground up rubber. It is clearly stated not to use tracer rounds. There is always a range officer on the lanes, and they are looking closely at the ammo people use.

They also allow aluminum cased ammo. They do separate the brass and steel, but have to pick out the aluminum. They may ban aluminum in the future, but for now, it is allowed.

6 Likes

I’ve mostly seen sand used but I guess the ground up rubber is somewhat common. Make sense. It’s seems good for that - but I know first hand that once rubber tires start burning it is really hard to put out.

At one time, I worked on a prototype system in NJ that ground up old tires and shot them into a boiler as fuel. The experiment failed. They couldn’t control the emissions or the molten drek that stuck to the inside of the the boiler.

6 Likes

I think my range has also grounded rubber backstop.

3 Likes

I never have either.

4 Likes

Wow! I wish could say the same. First time I shot was at my uncles farm when I was 7 or 8, 22 rifle.
A couple times in scouts at the scout camp.

2 Likes