M*CARBO Brotherhood

22lr blows out side of casings

These are the casings from 4 rounds I shot recently, in an old remington single shot, bolt action rifle.

They fired fine. The bolt would lift, but couldn’t be pulled back.
#1-2 had to tapped out with a ram. #3 was able to be extracted with a hard pull on the bolt.
#4, the short, extracted easily.

There is no visible damage in the barrel or anywhere else I can see, that causes/allows this to happen.

Any ideas?

8 Likes

Of course what kind of ammo was it?

Have you tried pulling any bullets to see how tight they are seated…?
Measure the powder when you do.

5 Likes

The first 2 are CCI standard velocity, the 3rd is a Federal, and the short is a Remington.

I didn’t pull any bullets. After trying the Federal mfg w/same result, and the short, we stopped.

8 Likes

Load and eject an unfired cartridge and look for damage marks. The blowouts look to be in the same place.
Check the extractor and ejector for damage.

8 Likes

rare but possible check head spacing on rifle.
bolts get misplaced, bolts get replaced, and bolt never gets fitted. happens on old 22s, brit 303, mosin’s,ariskas. and you get a bad head space or a tight bolt. bought a old sears 22 like that a while back.

4 Likes

bulletin.accurateshooter.com/2018/01/headspace-101-what-you-need-to-know/

3 Likes

now a stupid question, does the rifle have short/long/long rifle stamped on barrel? some of the pre 20s stuff only shoots Longs and shorts…its stamped on the barrel

7 Likes

Who used the firearm last? Was there any issues? Did they clean it after use?

Did you chamber check and inspect/clean before firing?

Let’s see some pics of that rifle!!:face_with_monocle::scream::eyes:

5 Likes

@GOBLIN Yes, it is stamped all three. I would have fired a long also, but didn’t have one handy.
I haven’t had a chance to look at it again after shooting it that day. It’s an old gun, with expected wear from considerable use, but it didn’t have any visible damage/obvious red flag issues.

@MountainHunter I don’t know history on this firearm. Upon a cursory look it was dry, however appeared clean, bolt dropped in/out and functioned smoothly, so I fired first round as it was.
After I tapped out #1, I pulled bolt, wiped down, inspected, and oiled everything, ran patches through barrel etc.

It’s down at my neighbors at the moment, but I will get a pick when I get a chance.

6 Likes

Hmmm… See if you got a shooting bro with a bore scope. If not I would suspect that you have some rust, crud or hard carbon build up in the chamber right where the case and bullet separate causing high pressure. You need to absolutely clean the poop out of the chamber then follow up with some Flitz bore cleaner or JB bore paste.

7 Likes

What ever happened? We want to know! :face_with_monocle::boom::boom::boom:

6 Likes

@MountainHunter Really He left Us Hanging Again! :thinking: @jeffing65 Yo’ So Jeff whats the rest of the Story? Were Dying Here to Know’ We know the Complaint’ So the Cause? And the Repair? :rofl:

4 Likes

@everyone

Sorry guys. It temporarily ended up on the back burner.
Between a torn rotary cup in my shoulder, the windy, rainy weather, and other more pressing tasks, I haven’t felt like or had time to get back to it.

As soon as I do, I will post an update on what I find…

4 Likes

No Hurting Yourself ! Get Mended ! Sorry Ya got the ‘‘Juno town’’ Weather. Apology Accepted !

4 Likes

Bought my dad an old Savage M19?? years ago that did something similar. The chamber had a huge “pit” in the side. Got lucky and found a brand new barrel for it. Now it looks funny. Barrel that looks like it’s new/blue and the rest of the rifle looks like it’s 100 years old.

3 Likes

That’s what I suspected/still suspect. We couldn’t see anything like that, but it’s really hard to get a good look at it, so that still may be the cause. The barrel is in rough condition on the outside, and has been coated with some kind of rust-mort in the past.

I’m feeling better, so maybe I can get around to looking at it a little more in a few days.

4 Likes

Might be able to get a small piece of copper wire, bend it with some pliers (sort of a L shape just long enough to reach from the back of the chamber to the front on a .22) and insert it into the chamber.

Slowly rub the bent tip back to front and then twist slightly and repeat as you worth your way around the chamber. You might be able to feel the pit as a rough/draggy area that the tip catches in. The copper wire shouldn’t damage the chamber in any way (more than it it might be now.)

I’ve also put a small piece of white paper in the chamber, shined a flashlight on it and looked in the muzzle end. The white paper will really reflect the light into and up through the barrel.

Good luck with it.

6 Likes

That’s a good thought on the copper wire. It couldn’t possibly damage it.
I was thinking of 2 things.
One was putting a tiny layer of visible grease on a round, cycle it, and see if it marks inside any pits/grooves or ? other irregularities.

The other is the same idea. I have a “real” super-fine white powder, that’s used for determining wind when calling/hunting coyotes. It might be visible in pits.

2 Likes

The first pic the case on the right has something black on it?

2 Likes

Just now thought. I need to pull a bullet and powder, and fire just a primer.

3 Likes